Ear Wax Removal

At Applied Hearing Solutions, we can remove excess wax in our Phoenix office using a number of safe and effective methods.

Effective Earwax Cleaning

Many healthcare providers only have one method of cerumen (earwax) removal that they utilize. The Audiologists at Applied Hearing Solutions use three different methods for removing wax, depending on what is right for that patient; irrigation (using water), manually with curet or microsuction.

When earwax builds up in your ears and is challenging to clear out, you should come to see us. We'll analyze the condition, determine the core cause, and provide earwax removal treatment as needed. Earwax removal doesn't have to be difficult, and it should help you return to your life as normal. If you or a loved one is concerned about earwax, please call us for an evaluation and treatment choices suited to your unique needs. Here is some more information about the methods we use at our clinic in Phoenix.

Earigator (Water Irrigation)

The Earigator is a minimally invasive cerumen management system to provide effective and safe earwax removal. This system was designed by an otolaryngologist and controls for factors like temperature and pressure. It also has illumination and magnification, which helps our Audiologists to see the wax buildup as they are cleaning. Using water irrigation is helpful for use on patients that have dry wax that has adhered to the canal wall. Manual extraction (using curette) would be painful, so having the Earigator for these patients provides us a more comfortable option. It also has the added benefit of not needing the wax to be pre-softened before removal.

Microsuction

Microsuction is a water-free, safe and effective way to remove excess ear wax. For some patients a water-free technique is necessary or preferred, including those with a perforated eardrum (tympanic membrane), diabetics, or those that are taking blood thinners. Our Audiologists will use a tiny vacuum to gently suction, dislodge and remove earwax buildup. Before starting the earwax removal, our Audiologists will perform a thorough inspection of the patient's ear canal to determine where the wax is and if they are a candidate for microsuction. For some patients a water-free technique is necessary or preferred, including those with a perforated eardrum (tympanic membrane), diabetics, or those that are taking blood thinners.


Manual Cerumen Removal (Using Curette)

When the wax has not adhered to the canal wall or when the other options are contraindicated, manual removal with curette is performed. A curette has a loop or "spoon" at the end, which helps the Audiologist gather, collect and move the wax gently. This method has been used for many years by healthcare providers and can be very effective when done correctly.

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